Peter Richtsmeier, Ph.D., CCC-SLP


Assistant Professor

Basic Information

peter richtsmeierContact Information

Oklahoma State University
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
018 Murray Hall
Stillwater, OK 74078
405-744-8030

Education

B.A., Washington University
Ph.D., University of Arizona
M.S., Purdue University

Courses Taught

Phonological Disorders
Advanced Language Disorders
Phonetics

Personal Interests

One son, a dog, and a cat
Running
Music and literature in and around Oklahoma

Research

Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

Lab Page

Research Interests

Dr. Peter Richtsmeier is an expert in the areas of speech development and speech sound disorders. His research career began in the field of linguistics. He studied typical phonological development at the University of Arizona under Drs. LouAnn Gerken and Diane Ohala, and he defended his dissertation in 2008. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Lisa Goffman at Purdue University, Dr. Richtsmeier transitioned to speech-language pathology in order to better understand child speech and language disorders. He completed his clinical master’s degree at Purdue in 2014. At Oklahoma State, Dr. Richtsmeier teaches courses on developmental speech and language disorders. He also directs the Phon Farm research laboratory where he and his students conduct experiments on child speech development.

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Richtsmeier, P. T. (in press). Phonological and semantic cues to learning from word-types. Laboratory Phonology.

Richtsmeier, P. T. & Goffman, L. (2015). Trajectories of speech motor learning in typical and impaired children. Journal of Communication Disorders, 55, 31-43. doi: 10.1016/j.jcomdis.2015.02.001

Richtsmeier, P. T. (2011). Extraction of phonotactic sequences by adults is facilitated by word-types not word-tokens. Laboratory Phonology, 2, 157-183. doi:10.1515/LABPHON.2011.005

Richtsmeier, P. T., Gerken, L. A., & Ohala, D. K. (2011). Contributions of phonetic token variability and word-type frequency to phonological representations. Journal of Child Language, 38(5), 951-978. doi:10.1017/S0305000910000371

Other Publications and Manuscripts

Richtsmeier, P. T. & Goffman, L. Tapered statistical learning over time in child speech. In revision.

Goffman, L. & Richtsmeier, P. T. Prosody and stress clash in the speech of children with typical and atypical language development. In revision.

McAllister Byun, T., Richtsmeier, P., & Maas, E. (2013). Covert contrast in child phonology is not necessarily extragrammatical. Extended abstracts from the annual meeting of the Linguistic Society of America, Boston, MA. http://elanguage.net/journals/lsameeting/article/view/3553eLangauge

Narayan, A., Weber, N., Richtsmeier, P. T., Trinetta, V., and Nelson, D. (2012). Postdoctoral needs and concerns: Purdue University and beyond. POSTDOCket, http://www.nationalpostdoc.org/publications/postdocket

Richtsmeier, P. T. (2010). Child phoneme errors are not substitutions. Toronto Working Papers in Linguistics, 33. Retrieved from\\ http://twpl.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/twpl/article/view/6889

Richtsmeier, P. T., Gerken, L. A., & Ohala, D. K. (2009). Induction of phonotactics from word-types and word-tokens. In J. Chandlee, M. Franchini, S. Lord, and M. Rheiner (Eds.) Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development (pp. 432-443). Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press

Recent Presentations

Richtsmeier, P. T. (2015, November). Apps for data collection and presentation in school-based speech therapy: A review. Poster presented at the annual ASHA convention, Denver, CO.

Richtsmeier, P. T. & Goffman, L. (2015, June). Perceptual learning does not always facilitate speech production. Poster presented at the meeting of the Symposium for Research on Child Language Disorders, Madison, WI.

Richtsmeier, P. T. (2015, March). How Talkers, Words, & Talking Support Phonological Acquisition. Invited talk to be presented at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Richtsmeier, P. T. (2013, September). Where in memory does statistical learning happen? Paper presented at the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences brown bag, Purdue University.